WAR CHINA THREATENS TO INVADE TAIWAN

Doomer Doug

TB Fanatic
Livingspace! In Hitler's case it was Poland and the Ukraine and Russia, but in Xi the Merciless view, it is the USA for land and Canada for fresh water. The reason Trudeau junior is a traitor is he has been paid off since Canada is the Saudi Arabia of fresh water.

Traitors everywhere I look these days.
 

Crusty Echo 7

Contributing Member
China is looking for an ‘enemy’ to unite its population to shift blame for the PRC’s economy tanking and COVID. The biggest problem for us are the chip manufacturing is dominated by China and a substantial amount is produced in Taiwan.
 

jward

passin' thru
Japan defense minister warns of Crimea-style invasion of Taiwan
In veiled reference to China, Kishi says wars can begin without troops

Japanese Defense Minister Nobuo Kishi speaks via video during the 18th CSIS/Nikkei Symposium on Oct 22. (Screenshot)
ERI SUGIURA, Nikkei staff writerOctober 22, 2021 11:22 JSTUpdated on October 23, 2021 23:54 JST
TOKYO -- In a veiled reference to China's recent aggressive moves on Taiwan, Japan's defense minister pointed to Russia's annexation of Crimea as an example of how an invasion can begin without deploying troops.
Russia's act was an "illegal annexation of Crimea," Nobuo Kishi said on Friday in a video message to the 18th CSIS/Nikkei Symposium. "An invasion may begin without anyone realizing it, and a war may be fought without the use of military forces."
Information control and cyberattacks became prominent before Russian troops took control of the Crimean region in 2014.

Kishi's comments come as China ratchets up pressure on Taiwan. Earlier this month, Beijing flew a record number of warplanes near the island it claims but has never ruled, and Taiwan's defense minister warned that China already has the ability to invade and will be capable of mounting a "full scale" invasion by 2025.
Kishi, the younger brother of former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, told the forum that freedom and democracy are threatened in Asia and other parts of the world due to attempts to "unilaterally change the status quo by force or coercion."
He stressed the need to adopt new technologies in the cyberspace and outer space sectors to cope with threats from China and other powers.
On top of China deploying coast guard vessels near Japan's Senkaku Islands, which Beijing claims and calls Diaoyu, and its aerial incursions near Taiwan, North Korea is testing a wider range of missiles that are more difficult for intelligence agencies to monitor and detect.
"Powerful nations are continuing to strengthen their military power to gain dominance in space and cyberspace," Kishi said. "North Korea has not only existing missiles but also advanced technology. Democracy is in danger everywhere in the world."

Defense Minister Kishi's warnings come as so-called hybrid warfare and gray zone tactics increasingly attract global attention. These include disinformation, economic manipulation, use of proxies and insurgencies and diplomatic pressure.
Competition in space is intensifying with China, Russia and the U.S. building space stations. The Financial Times reported this week that the Chinese military conducted two hypersonic weapons tests over the summer, with sources saying a rocket launched in July used a "fractional orbital bombardment" system to propel a nuclear-capable hypersonic glide vehicle around the earth for the first time.
Meanwhile, countries are competing to gain an edge in electronic warfare using the electromagnetic spectrum -- the frequency bands of all electromagnetic waves, including radio waves, microwaves, X-rays and infrared, used in everything from GPS, to missile precision attacks and advanced radar.

"With regard to these new areas, [Japan's] Self-Defense Forces are in a position to follow the world as we have just taken a step forward. We need to proactively embrace advanced technology," Kishi said.
The minister, who highlighted the need to increase the country's defense budget, also argued that Japan's efforts in cyberspace, outer space and the electromagnetic spectrum would bolster the Japan-U.S. alliance.
"The U.S. is ahead of us in technology, and currently Japan may seem dependent on the U.S. But I hope Japan can make a contribution with its unique technology," he said, noting that the country has foundations of cutting-edge science and technology.
Former Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage, center, Joseph Nye, a former dean of Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government, right, and Michael Green, CSIS's senior vice president for Asia and Japan Chair, attend the 18th CSIS/Nikkei Symposium online. (Screenshot)

The forum, hosted each autumn by Nikkei and the Center for Strategic and International Studies, a Washington think tank, was held partially online this year because of the pandemic.
John Hamre, CSIS president, argued in his opening keynote speech that the U.S. should rejoin the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership as "foreign policy in Asia is about trade policy."
The former deputy secretary of defense in the Clinton administration said that the Biden administration's failure to take a forward leading position to rejoin the pact is "a mistake, especially when China is trying to join the pact."
In a later session, former Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage said that China's pressuring of Taiwan has resulted in having "more and more people rallying to the side of Taiwan."
Japan this year mentioned Taiwan in its defense white paper for the first time in three decades, while France, the U.K. and Germany have increased their presence in the South China Sea. "What China has been doing is scoring its own goal," Armitage said.

Speaking at the same session, Joseph Nye, a former dean of Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government, warned that if the U.S. was to drop its "One China" policy, "we would be stirring up a hornet's nest."
He said the key was to discourage the use of force without encouraging the temptation to de jure independence, adding that the Biden administration is "handling it well, trying to strengthening the deterrence while at the same time not precipitating to crises."
In a panel discussion on the U.S.-China strategic rivalry, panelists argued for the need for Taiwan, Japan and other neighbors of China to increase deterrence against the Asian superpower.
Shinichi Kitaoka, emeritus professor of the University of Tokyo, said Japan should also aim to have 2% of its GDP as defense budget, similar to levels of NATO countries, as deterrence is a "way for safety." His comments are in line with the ruling Liberal Democratic Party's manifesto.

Retired U.S. Navy Admiral James Stavridis said the U.S. and its allies need to ensure that Taiwan has defensive weapons systems that can create a sense of deterrence on the mainland.
But, James Steinberg, another former deputy secretary of state, alarmed that a mechanism to prevent collision is also needed. "We need to obviously be aware of specific flashpoints, but we need to have the kind of protections, and make sure we know how to manage these things right," he said.
Rumi Aoyama, professor at Waseda University's Graduate School of Asia-Pacific Studies, said attention also needs to be paid to China's domestic situation.
President Xi Jinping's push for "common prosperity" will have "a huge impact on economic growth and social stability, which could turn China's external behavior even tougher," she said.
 

Housecarl

On TB every waking moment
Japan defense minister warns of Crimea-style invasion of Taiwan
In veiled reference to China, Kishi says wars can begin without troops

Japanese Defense Minister Nobuo Kishi speaks via video during the 18th CSIS/Nikkei Symposium on Oct 22. (Screenshot)
ERI SUGIURA, Nikkei staff writerOctober 22, 2021 11:22 JSTUpdated on October 23, 2021 23:54 JST
TOKYO -- In a veiled reference to China's recent aggressive moves on Taiwan, Japan's defense minister pointed to Russia's annexation of Crimea as an example of how an invasion can begin without deploying troops.
Russia's act was an "illegal annexation of Crimea," Nobuo Kishi said on Friday in a video message to the 18th CSIS/Nikkei Symposium. "An invasion may begin without anyone realizing it, and a war may be fought without the use of military forces."
Information control and cyberattacks became prominent before Russian troops took control of the Crimean region in 2014.

Kishi's comments come as China ratchets up pressure on Taiwan. Earlier this month, Beijing flew a record number of warplanes near the island it claims but has never ruled, and Taiwan's defense minister warned that China already has the ability to invade and will be capable of mounting a "full scale" invasion by 2025.
Kishi, the younger brother of former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, told the forum that freedom and democracy are threatened in Asia and other parts of the world due to attempts to "unilaterally change the status quo by force or coercion."
He stressed the need to adopt new technologies in the cyberspace and outer space sectors to cope with threats from China and other powers.
On top of China deploying coast guard vessels near Japan's Senkaku Islands, which Beijing claims and calls Diaoyu, and its aerial incursions near Taiwan, North Korea is testing a wider range of missiles that are more difficult for intelligence agencies to monitor and detect.
"Powerful nations are continuing to strengthen their military power to gain dominance in space and cyberspace," Kishi said. "North Korea has not only existing missiles but also advanced technology. Democracy is in danger everywhere in the world."

Defense Minister Kishi's warnings come as so-called hybrid warfare and gray zone tactics increasingly attract global attention. These include disinformation, economic manipulation, use of proxies and insurgencies and diplomatic pressure.
Competition in space is intensifying with China, Russia and the U.S. building space stations. The Financial Times reported this week that the Chinese military conducted two hypersonic weapons tests over the summer, with sources saying a rocket launched in July used a "fractional orbital bombardment" system to propel a nuclear-capable hypersonic glide vehicle around the earth for the first time.
Meanwhile, countries are competing to gain an edge in electronic warfare using the electromagnetic spectrum -- the frequency bands of all electromagnetic waves, including radio waves, microwaves, X-rays and infrared, used in everything from GPS, to missile precision attacks and advanced radar.

"With regard to these new areas, [Japan's] Self-Defense Forces are in a position to follow the world as we have just taken a step forward. We need to proactively embrace advanced technology," Kishi said.
The minister, who highlighted the need to increase the country's defense budget, also argued that Japan's efforts in cyberspace, outer space and the electromagnetic spectrum would bolster the Japan-U.S. alliance.
"The U.S. is ahead of us in technology, and currently Japan may seem dependent on the U.S. But I hope Japan can make a contribution with its unique technology," he said, noting that the country has foundations of cutting-edge science and technology.
Former Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage, center, Joseph Nye, a former dean of Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government, right, and Michael Green, CSIS's senior vice president for Asia and Japan Chair, attend the 18th CSIS/Nikkei Symposium online. (Screenshot)

The forum, hosted each autumn by Nikkei and the Center for Strategic and International Studies, a Washington think tank, was held partially online this year because of the pandemic.
John Hamre, CSIS president, argued in his opening keynote speech that the U.S. should rejoin the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership as "foreign policy in Asia is about trade policy."
The former deputy secretary of defense in the Clinton administration said that the Biden administration's failure to take a forward leading position to rejoin the pact is "a mistake, especially when China is trying to join the pact."
In a later session, former Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage said that China's pressuring of Taiwan has resulted in having "more and more people rallying to the side of Taiwan."
Japan this year mentioned Taiwan in its defense white paper for the first time in three decades, while France, the U.K. and Germany have increased their presence in the South China Sea. "What China has been doing is scoring its own goal," Armitage said.

Speaking at the same session, Joseph Nye, a former dean of Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government, warned that if the U.S. was to drop its "One China" policy, "we would be stirring up a hornet's nest."
He said the key was to discourage the use of force without encouraging the temptation to de jure independence, adding that the Biden administration is "handling it well, trying to strengthening the deterrence while at the same time not precipitating to crises."
In a panel discussion on the U.S.-China strategic rivalry, panelists argued for the need for Taiwan, Japan and other neighbors of China to increase deterrence against the Asian superpower.
Shinichi Kitaoka, emeritus professor of the University of Tokyo, said Japan should also aim to have 2% of its GDP as defense budget, similar to levels of NATO countries, as deterrence is a "way for safety." His comments are in line with the ruling Liberal Democratic Party's manifesto.

Retired U.S. Navy Admiral James Stavridis said the U.S. and its allies need to ensure that Taiwan has defensive weapons systems that can create a sense of deterrence on the mainland.
But, James Steinberg, another former deputy secretary of state, alarmed that a mechanism to prevent collision is also needed. "We need to obviously be aware of specific flashpoints, but we need to have the kind of protections, and make sure we know how to manage these things right," he said.
Rumi Aoyama, professor at Waseda University's Graduate School of Asia-Pacific Studies, said attention also needs to be paid to China's domestic situation.
President Xi Jinping's push for "common prosperity" will have "a huge impact on economic growth and social stability, which could turn China's external behavior even tougher," she said.

IMHO the public "One China" Policy is a lie of convenience that lived out its usefulness a long time ago and in fact is only encouraging the CCP regime in Beijing to ratchet up its actions, being used by them as a "final straw" just like Gleason's character on the old Honeymooners.

By Beijing's own statements they aren't going to stop with Taiwan even if they were to come to some kind of an "understanding" between themselves.

The drawing of parallels to the situation in Ukraine, and by extension the Baltic States, by Japan's defense minister unfortunately is the correct view to take.
 

Grumphau

Senior Member
IMHO the public "One China" Policy is a lie of convenience that lived out its usefulness a long time ago and in fact is only encouraging the CCP regime in Beijing to ratchet up its actions, being used by them as a "final straw" just like Gleason's character on the old Honeymooners.

By Beijing's own statements they aren't going to stop with Taiwan even if they were to come to some kind of an "understanding" between themselves.

The drawing of parallels to the situation in Ukraine, and by extension the Baltic States, by Japan's defense minister unfortunately is the correct view to take.
Yes I could easily see a kind of color revolution in Taiwan, staged by CCP agents, with China trying to play it off as an indigenous movement. I could see the Biden administration being extremely relieved, since the Taiwan problem would be resolved and the US wouldn't have to intervene as it would be the "will of the Taiwanese people".

But this isn't Crimea and I think there is a good chance the Taiwanese military would crush any "green men" that the Chinese try to send. After that I'm not sure... China might try to land troops, or some other action. I can't see them backing down though.
 

Housecarl

On TB every waking moment
Yes I could easily see a kind of color revolution in Taiwan, staged by CCP agents, with China trying to play it off as an indigenous movement. I could see the Biden administration being extremely relieved, since the Taiwan problem would be resolved and the US wouldn't have to intervene as it would be the "will of the Taiwanese people".

But this isn't Crimea and I think there is a good chance the Taiwanese military would crush any "green men" that the Chinese try to send. After that I'm not sure... China might try to land troops, or some other action. I can't see them backing down though.
All such a "Color Revolution"/"Green Men" operation would need to do is both pause international reaction and muddy the water enough to allow for a foot hold on Taiwanese territory. The "protests" and "autonomous zones" in Portland and other US cities could be the model of such an opener. After that the crisis could be throttled up and down as the CCP sees fit until their final goals are attained. Stopping such a scenario from starting in the first place is key.
 

northern watch

Has No Life - Lives on TB
The opening moves I expect to see for a Chinese invasion of Taiwan

1 Assassinations of Taiwanese Military and Political leaders
2 Cyber attacks on Taiwanese computers, internet sites
3 Physical attacks by Chinese agents on power plants, bridges, all critical infrastructure
4 An attempt to seize a Taiwanese airport or landing area or port (maybe, if enough Chinese agents are present to make this possible)

1 to 4 would occur simultaneously

The secondary moves I expect to see for a Chinese invasion of Taiwan

5 A massive missile attack on Taiwanese military targets
6 An attack on Taiwanese shipping by Chinese Air Force and Navy
7 If the attempt to seize a Taiwanese airport, landing area or port is successful, then follow up forces will arrive

5 to 7 would occur simultaneously

The third move would be the actual invasion of Taiwan

The Chinese military must know before any of this happens, what the US will do.

These are some thoughts, please add what you expect to happen.
I am revising my "The opening moves I expect to see for a Chinese invasion of Taiwan"

I did not know that China had drove planes, I would expect them to make an appearance before the actual invasion of Taiwan starts, their purpose would be to draw out and down Taiwan anti-aircraft defenses.
 

TorahTips

Membership Revoked
If the chinese are ever going to do this it must be before biden leaves office........tic toc.......
Think about this.... I don't think the democrats want to lose their control over congress. It is likely -- if Biden continues on the way he has been going, there will be a significant shift in power. That means that the democrats may be looking for a way to take him out with the garbage already. China would need to react sooner rather than later. I can't see Harris as being the pRESIDENT very long. The time for China to act is before Joe goes away.
 

jward

passin' thru
US, China sparring over Taiwan heats up anew
Posted October 26, 2021 5:07 p.m. EDT



FILE - In this Aug. 27, 2021, file photo provided by U.S. Coast Guard, Legend-class U.S. Coast Guard National Security Cutter Munro (WMSL 755) transits the Taiwan Strait during a routine transit with Arleigh Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Kidd (DDG 100). The United States and China are stepping up their war of words over Taiwan in a long-simmering dispute that has significant implications for the power dynamic in the Indo-Pacific and beyond. (U.S. Coast Guard via AP, File)

By MATTHEW LEE, AP Diplomatic Writer
WASHINGTON — The United States and China are stepping up their war of words over Taiwan in a long-simmering dispute that has significant implications for the power dynamic in the Indo-Pacific and beyond.

Amid a surge in Chinese military activity near the island that China regards as a renegade province and has vowed to reclaim by force if necessary, Washington and Beijing have launched new campaigns for global support for their respective positions, each using the stern and lofty language of sovereignty and international precedent. And neither is backing down.
While the disagreement over Taiwan isn’t new and has long vexed relations between the countries, recent developments suggest the two are coming closer to confrontation. Last week, President Joe Biden set off alarm bells in Beijing by saying the U.S. has a firm commitment to help Taiwan defend itself in the event of a Chinese attack.
China protested and the Biden administration sought to play down the comments. White House, State Department and Pentagon officials all said the president did not mean to imply any changes in the U.S. “one-China policy,” which recognizes Beijing but allows informal relations and defense ties with Taipei.

The officials took pains to say that America's commitment to Taiwan remains steadfast but continues to be guided by a policy of “strategic ambiguity” over military-related specifics that falls short of a treaty-enshrined mutual defense pact. Since then, however, the administration has upped the ante on the diplomatic front.
Secretary of State Antony Blinken on Tuesday publicly urged other members of the United Nations to reject China's assertion of absolute sovereignty over Taiwan and join the U.S. in supporting Taipei's independent participation in international organizations related to transportation, health, climate change, culture and education.

“As the international community faces an unprecedented number of complex and global issues, it is critical for all stakeholders to help address these problems,” Blinken said in a statement. “This includes the 24 million people who live in Taiwan. Taiwan’s meaningful participation in the UN system is not a political issue, but a pragmatic one.”
He noted that Taiwan has been prevented from participating in meetings of the International Civil Aviation Organization despite being a major transit hub and the World Health Organization despite having fielded an effective response to the COVID-19 pandemic.
“Taiwan’s exclusion undermines the important work of the UN and its related bodies, all of which stand to benefit greatly from its contributions,” Blinken said. “That is why we encourage all UN Member States to join us in supporting Taiwan’s robust, meaningful participation throughout the UN system and in the international community.”
State Department spokesman Ned Price declined to elaborate on what the administration would define as “meaningful participation."

Blinken's statement came just five days after Biden's remarks about Taiwan's defense and only two days after the State Department announced that senior U.S. and Taiwanese officials met virtually to discuss expanding Taiwan's participation in UN and other international groupings.
In that Oct. 22 meeting, administration officials "reiterated the U.S. commitment to Taiwan’s meaningful participation at the World Health Organization and UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and discussed ways to highlight Taiwan’s ability to contribute to efforts on a wide range of issues,” the State Department said.
Apart from complaining about Biden's initial comments, China reacted angrily to that discussion, slamming the administration for making “irresponsible statements” that encourage Taiwanese independence and demanding a halt to U.S. “official contacts” with the island's government.
“Taiwan’s participation in activities of the international organizations must be handled in accordance with the one-China principle,” foreign ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin said. “Taiwan’s attempts to expand its so-called ‘international space’ with foreign support are in nature seeking to expand the space for ‘Taiwan independence’ and secession. It will surely end in failure.”

The back-and-forth is playing out against a backdrop of increasing belligerence by both sides toward the other, even as they profess to have common interests on issues ranging from trade to climate to North Korea. Relations have plunged to new lows since nosediving under the Trump administration, which adopted a confrontational approach on trade, visas, diplomatic representation and educational exchanges.
While both former President Donald Trump and President Joe Biden have been firm in their opposition to Chinese activities in Tibet, Hong Kong, China's western Xinjiang region and the South China Sea, the Taiwan issue pre-dates most of those irritants.

China has recently upped its threat to bring Taiwan under its control by force if necessary by flying warplanes near the island and rehearsing beach landings.
China and Taiwan split during a civil war in 1949. The U.S. cut formal diplomatic relations with Taipei in 1979 in order to recognize Beijing. The U.S. does not openly contest China’s claim to Taiwan, but is committed by law to ensure the island can defend itself and to treat all threats toward it as matters of grave concern.
Under President Xi Jinping, who is also Communist Party leader and head of the armed forces, China has been stepping up military, diplomatic and economic pressure on Taiwan. Over its National Day weekend at the beginning of the month, China sent a record 149 military aircraft southwest of Taiwan in strike group formations, prompting Taiwan to scramble aircraft and activate its air defense missile systems.

China has also recently held beach landing exercises on its side of the roughly 160-kilometer-wide (100-mile-wide) Taiwan Strait, which, like the aircraft incursions, it described as a warning to Tsai Ing-wen’s administration.
The U.S. has reinforced its support for Taiwan with military sales.



Political News
 

jward

passin' thru
Taiwan FM warns China conflict would be global 'disaster'


Tue, 26 October 2021, 6:41 am·2-min read

Taiwan's foreign minister on Tuesday told AFP that any conflict between Taiwan and China would be "a disaster -- not only for Taiwan but also for China and the rest of the world".
Speaking during a visit to Slovakia, Joseph Wu also said that China may be ramping up tensions with Taiwan to "divert domestic attention" from an economic slowdown and power shortages.
Tensions have soared as Beijing steps up air incursions near Taiwan, a self-ruling democracy that the growing Asian power has vowed one day to take over, by force if necessary.

"The classical theory of authoritarian regimes is that, whenever there is a domestic crisis, they would like to create external crises to divert domestic attention.
"This might be the problem we need to confront," Wu said after giving a speech at an event organised by Globsec, a Slovak international affairs think tank.

"If you look at the current Chinese situation internally, the economy has been slowing down and Western sanctions on China seem to be taking a toll and in recent months we saw that there is a serious shortage of power.
"These kinds of situations might create an environment for the authoritarian leader to think about an action externally to divert domestic attention," he said.
"The threat is there and the threat is getting worse," he added.
In his speech in Bratislava, Wu also called for stronger economic ties as part of a "democratic supply chain", talking up in particular Taiwan's potential to help the automotive industry -- the backbone of the Slovak economy.
"Having reliable suppliers with shared faith in democracy and freedom will supercharge our economies. This is especially important when authoritarian regimes are weaponising trade and orchestrating coercions against democracies," he said.
Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian earlier protested against Wu's visit to Slovakia and neighbouring Czech Republic saying he was "a typical Taiwan independence separatist".

"China firmly opposes these countries conniving with Taiwan independence separatists and demands that relevant countries abide by the 'one China' principle and do not provide a platform for activities of Taiwan independence separatists," he said.
Wu's visit comes as a delegation focused on boosting trade and economic ties tours those countries as well as Lithuania, another EU member state that sparked a diplomatic row with China by agreeing to let Taiwan open a representative office under its own name.
Earlier in the year, Lithuania also left China's 17+1 cooperation forum with Central and Eastern Europe, calling it divisive.
 

BV141

Has No Life - Lives on TB
All such a "Color Revolution"/"Green Men" operation would need to do is both pause international reaction and muddy the water enough to allow for a foot hold on Taiwanese territory. The "protests" and "autonomous zones" in Portland and other US cities could be the model of such an opener. After that the crisis could be throttled up and down as the CCP sees fit until their final goals are attained. Stopping such a scenario from starting in the first place is key.
Heard that 300,000 Taiwanese have married Chinese Mainlanders.
Bring them to Taiwan and the foothold has started. Like mass computer outages through cyber attacks...from within.
 

northern watch

Has No Life - Lives on TB
Biden calls out China's Taiwan actions as 'coercive'
President Joe Biden has told leaders at the East Asia Summit that China’s recent actions in the Taiwan Straits are “coercive” and undermined peace and stability in the region
By EILEEN NG and NINIEK KARMINI Associated Press
27 October 2021, 12:03

In this image released by Brunei ASEAN Summit, United States President Joe Biden speaks in the virtual meetingof ASEAN - East Asia Summit on the sidelines of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) summit with the leaders, Wednesday, Oct.

Image Icon
The Associated Press
In this image released by Brunei ASEAN Summit, United States President Joe Biden speaks in the virtual meetingof ASEAN - East Asia Summit on the sidelines of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) summit with the leaders, Wednesday, Oct. 27, 2021. Southeast Asian leaders began their annual summit without Myanmar on Tuesday amid a diplomatic standoff over the exclusion of the leader of the military-ruled nation from the group's meetings. (Brunei ASEAN Summit via AP)

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia -- President Joe Biden told leaders at the East Asia Summit on Wednesday that China's recent actions in the Taiwan Straits are “coercive" and undermined peace and stability in the region.

The comments by Biden, who participated by video in the annual meeting of 18 Asia-Pacific nations, come during a surge in Chinese military activity near the island that China regards as a renegade province and has vowed to reclaim by force if necessary.

“The president also reiterated the U.S. commitment to the international rules-based order and expressed concern over threats to that order,” the White House said in a statement. “He made clear that the United States will continue to stand with allies and partners in support of democracy, human rights, rule of law, and freedom of the seas.”

Last week, Biden set off alarm bells in Beijing by saying the U.S. has a firm commitment to help Taiwan defend itself in the event of a Chinese attack.

The White House later downplayed the president’s comments, which came during a CNN town hal
l, and said he did not mean to imply any changes in the U.S. “one-China policy,” which recognizes Beijing but allows informal relations and defense ties with Taipei.

Relations between Washington and Beijing have plunged to new lows since nosediving under former President Donald Trump's administration, which adopted a confrontational approach on trade, visas, diplomatic representation and educational exchanges.

A U.S. nuclear submarine deal with Australia and the U.K. has also angered China, which claims most of the disputed South China Sea and warned the pact would threaten regional stability.

Some nations such as Indonesia and Malaysia also fear the pact could escalate tensions and spark an arms race.

“Indonesia does not want this region to become an arms race and a power projection that can threaten stability,” Indonesian President Joko Widodo told his Australian counterpart Scott Morrison, according to Indonesia's foreign minister.

Australia announced a $93 million package to support security, climate and health efforts in Southeast Asia, while Morrison defended the new pact with the U.S. and UK., saying it does not change Australia’s commitment to the Association of Southeast Asia Nations or the ASEAN outlook on the Indo-Pacific — "indeed it reinforces it.”

He said Australia had no intention of acquiring nuclear weapons and remained deeply committed to nuclear non-proliferation.

Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida said his country shared serious concern with ASEAN about challenges to the free and open maritime order in the East and South China seas, according to Japan's Foreign ministry.

He did not mention China by name, but Tokyo has more become vocal in defending the freedom of navigation and resolution of disputes based on international law, at a time China expands its military power beyond its shores, rattling neighbors with the construction of man-made islands and sending ships near their coasts.

The meetings have been clouded by a diplomatic standoff after military-ruled Myanmar skipped the summit in protest of ASEAN's move to bar Senior Gen. Min Aung Hlaing, whose forces seized power in February, from attending.

In Biden's private conversations with ASEAN leaders, he denounced the “horrific violence” by the military junta in Myanmar as he looks to press U.S. leadership in the Pacific.

“In Myanmar, we must address the tragedy caused by the military coup which is increasingly undermining regional stability,” Biden told the leaders, according to the White House. The president added, “The United States stands for the people of Myanmar and calls for military regime to end the violence, release all political prisoners and return to the path of democracy.”

ASEAN's censure of Myanmar was its boldest after the bloc's envoy was prevented from meeting ousted leader Aung San Suu Kyi and other political detainees as part of a proposed dialogue to ease the crisis that has left more than 1,100 mostly anti-military protesters dead.

Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong expressed concern over the detention in Myanmar of Australian academician Sean Turnell, who served as an economic adviser to Suu Kyi’s government. Morrison thanked Lee for the concern, a Southeast Asian diplomat, who took part in the meeting, told The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because of a lack of authority to discuss the discussions publicly.

Myanmar has refused to send a junior representative to the summit, and slammed ASEAN’s move as going against the bloc’s principles of non-interference in each other’s affairs and decision-making by consensus. Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen said Myanmar’s decision to snub the summit was “regrettable” and hinted he may also consider not inviting the military-led nation’s top general to a video summit of more than 50 Asian and European countries Cambodia will host next month, the diplomat said.

There have been concerns that European leaders may skip the summit and just send lower-ranking representatives if the Myanmar general will be allowed to join, according to the diplomat.

In a chairman’s statement released after the summit Tuesday, the bloc’s leaders urged Myanmar to give its envoy, Brunei Second Foreign Minister Eryan Yusof, full access to all parties and release political detainees.

While respecting ASEAN's principle of non-interference, the bloc said it must also strike a balance in terms of rule of law, good governance, democracy and constitutional government in Myanmar's situation.

“We reiterated that Myanmar remains a member of the ASEAN family and recognized that Myanmar needs both time and political space to deal with its many and complex challenges," the group said.

————

Karmini reported from Jakarta, Indonesia. Associated Press journalists Jim Gomez in Manila, Philippines, Kiko Rosario and Grant Peck in Bangkok, Mari Yamaguchi in Tokyo and Aamer Madhani in Washington contributed to this report.

Biden calls out China's Taiwan actions as 'coercive' - ABC News (go.com)
 

jward

passin' thru
Jerome Taylor
@JeromeTaylor

21m

Taiwan's President Tsai Ing-wen said she has "faith" that the United States will defend the island in the event China launches a military strike, in an interview with CNN broadcast Wednesday —
@AFP
Tsai also confirmed presence of a small number of US troops in Taiwan to help w training — a program confirmed to @AFP & other media by a Pentagon official earlier this month. She also renewed her offer of talks with Beijing, something China has consistently rebuffed since 2016
Tsai’s confirmation of US troop presence is significant because while it’s been known, it’s the first time such confirmation has come from the Taiwanese side.


View: https://twitter.com/JeromeTaylor/status/1453503186010918917?s=20
 

33dInd

Veteran Member
Jerome Taylor
@JeromeTaylor

21m

Taiwan's President Tsai Ing-wen said she has "faith" that the United States will defend the island in the event China launches a military strike, in an interview with CNN broadcast Wednesday —
@AFP
Tsai also confirmed presence of a small number of US troops in Taiwan to help w training — a program confirmed to @AFP & other media by a Pentagon official earlier this month. She also renewed her offer of talks with Beijing, something China has consistently rebuffed since 2016
Tsai’s confirmation of US troop presence is significant because while it’s been known, it’s the first time such confirmation has come from the Taiwanese side.


View: https://twitter.com/JeromeTaylor/status/1453503186010918917?s=20
I think she’s in for a rude awakening
 

jward

passin' thru
O I doubt she believes it, too many americans' still left in A'stan for her to expect ole lyin' Jo dog faced pony-soldier to send in the cavalry, but she plays the hand dealt her as best as she can
 

Blue 5

Veteran Member
If I were Taiwanese I'd be looking to move out of the country. I hate to say it but they don't stand a chance against the commies. They can't look to us either, because we don't have an effective (or legitimate!) government, let alone the military capability to handle that fight.
 

danielboon

Has No Life - Lives on TB
China’s Wang Yi warns European nations not to develop ties with Taiwan
posted for fair use
    • It is ‘especially important to guard against’ countries challenging the one-China principle, the foreign minister says
    • Speaking in Athens, he calls ties with Greece an example for other European countries to follow in dealing with Beijing


Published: 8:00pm, 28 Oct, 2021




Foreign Minister Wang Yi is greeted in Athens by his Greek counterpart Nikos Dendias. Photo: EPA-EFE

Foreign Minister Wang Yi is greeted in Athens by his Greek counterpart Nikos Dendias. Photo: EPA-EFE
Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi has urged the European Union not to treat Beijing as a rival and accused countries seeking closer ties with Taiwan of sabotaging EU-China relations.
He made the comments on Wednesday during a visit to Greece, the first stop of his four-nation tour of Europe, which also includes Serbia, Albania and Italy.
The trip, Wang’s first European visit this year, comes after China’s fraught relations with the EU hit a new low with the imposition of tit-for-tat sanctions over Beijing’s alleged mistreatment of Uygur Muslims in its Xinjiang region.
“China and the EU should respect each other, conduct exchanges on an equal footing, enhance understanding and manage differences,” Wang told his Greek counterpart Nikos Dendias, according to Xinhua.





Beijing hits back at Western sanctions against China’s alleged treatment of Uygur Muslims
Brushing aside their widening differences over human rights and Beijing’s assertive foreign policy, Wang insisted that China and the EU should be “partners” and “collaborators”, rather than “rivals” and “competitors”.


The EU has adapted its approach since 2019 to see China, its top trading partner, simultaneously as a partner, competitor and systemic rival.

“At present, it is especially important to guard against and prevent the attempts of some individual countries to challenge the one-China principle and undermine the political mutual trust between China and Europe,” he was quoted by Xinhua as saying.

Wang’s European tour came on the heels of a rare visit by Taiwanese Foreign Minister Joseph Wu this week to the Czech Republic and Slovakia, neither of which has official ties with the self-ruling island.

European countries’ attitudes towards Taiwan are undergoing delicate changes, especially with public opinions across Europe towards China turning increasingly negative in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic and spiralling US-China rivalry.

Beijing, hypersensitive to “interference of external forces” in cross-strait affairs, strongly condemned Wu’s European visit and a resolution by the European Parliament last week calling for stronger ties with Taiwan.
“Facing a world full of uncertainties and instabilities, China and Europe should enhance dialogue and communication, promote understanding and mutual trust, dispel misunderstandings and doubts, and consolidate our political foundation based on the one-China principle,” Wang was quoted by Xinhua as saying at a joint press conference with Dendias.

He highlighted China’s trade and investment clout and praised bilateral ties with Greece as an example for other European countries in dealing with differences with China.

Wang said China was willing to expand “the EU’s global interconnection strategy, so as to enhance the level of interconnection of the Eurasian continent, stimulate the growth potential of China and Europe, and accelerate the global economic recovery.”
He described the Greek port of Piraeus, controlled by China’s state-owned shipping giant Cosco, as an “emblematic” project of the Belt and Road Initiative and a model for mutually beneficial cooperation.

Amid EU scepticism, Cosco acquired a 51 per cent stake in the Mediterranean Sea port in 2016 at the height of Greece’s debt crisis. The Chinese company increased its stake to 67 per cent despite criticism from Greece’s opposition Syriza party and trade unions.
President Xi Jinping visited the project two years ago and called it “the head of the dragon”, referring to the belt and road, his signature foreign policy and outbound investment scheme.

“China is ready to work with Greece to build Piraeus into a world-class port,” Wang said, calling for the two sides to expand belt and road cooperation and increase mutual investment.
EU lawmakers to visit Taiwan next week to meet with Taipei officials
27 Oct 2021
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Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis also hailed the port project as a success and was quoted by Xinhua as telling Wang in Athens on Wednesday that Greece “attached great importance to developing relations with China and never agreed with any anti-China argument”.

Despite its dependence on Washington and Nato as security guarantors, Greece, still reeling from the decade-long debt crisis, has moved closer towards China and embraced its investment.
In 2016 and 2017, Greece blocked at least two EU statements criticising China for its expansive claims in the South China Sea dispute and human rights record, in moves widely criticised as undermining the unity of the 27-member bloc.
Wang also condemned the protesters – including exiled Hong Kong activist Joey Siu – who this month sought to disrupt a ceremony in Athens to light the Olympic flame for the Beijing 2022 Winter Games.
“Beijing is ready,” he said. “We are confident to be able to present a simple, safe and brilliant Olympic gala. The politicisation of sports distorts the Olympic purpose, and we should resist it together.”
Mitsotakis has agreed to attend the Games in February, despite calls from EU lawmakers to skip it unless Beijing changes its repressive policies in Hong Kong and Xinjiang.
 

danielboon

Has No Life - Lives on TB
China warns Taiwan’s decision to confirm presence of US troops could ‘trigger war’
China’s propaganda mouthpiece the Global times says Taiwan’s decision to confirm US troops are stationed on the island has “crossed the bottom line” and could “trigger war”.
posted for fair use

2 min read
October 28, 2021 - 6:16PM





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The Global Times has slammed Taiwan’s leader Tsai Ing-wen, claiming she was “inviting trouble” by confirming the presence of United States military trainers on the island nation.
During an interview with CNN on Thursday, Ms Tsai said the threat presented by Beijing was increasing “every day” and admitted for the first time American troops were training Taiwan’s military.
Chinese fighter jets made unprecedented incursions into Taiwanese airspace over the last month amid escalating tensions between Taipei and Beijing.
In the first five days of October alone Taiwan reported 150 incursions from Chinese fighter jets, nuclear-capable bombers and other military aircraft.

Responding to Ms Tsai’s admission, The Global Times warned Taiwan China will not “indulge” any behaviour which could “harm the country’s sovereignty”
“History will not forgive them. The Chinese mainland has the ability to execute the history's just judgment on them,” the Chinese publication stated.
“Regardless of the purpose, the fact that US troops are stationed in Taiwan has crossed the bottom line. It is one of the most dangerous factors that could trigger a war in the Taiwan Straits.”
Turning to the possibility of war, the Global Times said Taiwan’s attempts to seek out “support and protection” from external allies like the US could force China’s hand.






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“As the secessionist forces on the island seek support and protection, at the same time, they are also pushing the mainland to decide to resolve the Taiwan question by force," the article continued.
“They know very well that they are quenching their thirst with poison. They are hysterically drinking poison.
“We hold the initiative in deciding when to punish the Taiwan secessionist forces. We know how to solve the Taiwan question.”
The Global Times said secessionist forces in Taiwan would be on the “losing side” given China’s superior military advantages.
It comes after Beijing’s Foreign Ministry Spokesperson Zhao Lijian accused the US of “violating” the one-China principle by issuing a statement backing Taiwan’s involvement with the UN.









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"The US statement seriously violates the one-China principle and the stipulations of the three China-US joint communiqués,” Mr Zhao said during his Wednesday press conference.
“[It] violates the promise it has made, violates the basic norms governing international relations, and has sent seriously wrong signals to the ‘Taiwan independence’ forces.
“There is only one China in the world. The government of the People's Republic of China is the sole legal government representing the whole of China.
“The Taiwan region is an inalienable part of the Chinese territory.
“If the US still back-pedals in history today, it is pitting itself against the 1.4 billion Chinese people and the vast majority of countries in the world, and will only face another failure.”





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This stark warning which was directed at US and separatist forces in Taiwan came before Ms Tsai's interview with CNN, in which she described Taiwan as a “beacon” of democracy.
"Here is this island of 23 million people trying hard every day to protect ourselves and protect our democracy and making sure that our people have the kind of freedom they deserve," she said.
"If we fail, then that means people that believe in these values would doubt whether these are values that they (should) be fighting for.”
Ms Tsai refused to confirm how many US personnel were on the island but said it was “not as many as people thought”.
Taiwan and mainland China have been separately governed since the end of the Chinese civil war in 1949 where the Nationalists retreated to Taiwan.
 
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