PREP Overlooked Preps

coalcracker

Veteran Member
One last thing: This may be controversial, but I've used it many a time with success (lots of hiking, and also planting trees for a company) duck tape. Use it directly on the skin BEFORE you get the blister (and, NEVER pop a blister). I've wrapped my feet and hands, depending. It protects.
Faroe, I may have seen you on the Appalachian Trail back in the day. :vik: While hiking, I bet you carried that tape by wrapping it around your walking stick or hiking poles, too.
 

summerthyme

Administrator
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If I might suggest the Minimag. It runs on 2 AA batteries. Is bright enough to use around the house, and spotlight the yard, or woods. Easy to carry. Using AA is a real bonus. AA are used in a lot of other items so can scavenge from other items, and if you get rechargeable ones, you can recharge them with a genie, solar, etc... way easy. If you need your hands free you can stick it in your mouth, and if you're sitting in the bathroom it will stand up on it's own.

On the sewing it's not just the needles, its also the thread. To stitch up a tear in a pair of pants (I know it's fashionable to wear holy pants) it's not just pulling the two sides together and sewing it shut. Like skin. It's more in the way of darning socks. Meaning you will need to use a thread like they use in cross stitching, and make a weave out of the repair.

Maybe the ladies can give some advice on how to do that. I only remember my mom doing mine, when it wasn't fashionable to have holy pants. I know gasp, she even used patches over the hole.
Here is the modern version... https://www.amazon.com/HeatnBond-UltraHold-Iron-Adhesive-Inches/dp/B000XAMYXI/ref=sr_1_6?crid=PYZ9CFH4N0U6&dchild=1&keywords=fusible+webbing+for+fabric+applique&qid=1633961041&sprefix=Fusible+webbing,aps,938&sr=8-6

Buy a pack of this stuff, and you'll never spend hours cussing, trying to stitch a patch on the inside of a pair of jeans!

You use better parts of jeans too worn to save for the patch. I actually sent several "ready to apply" iron on patches in denim and khaki with our sons when they went off to college.

If you've got boys, you iron on patches on the knees of their jeans *before* they wear them!

Summerthyme
 

day late

money? whats that?
I forgot one thing earlier. Remember spare bow strings. A good string will last a long time, but it will fail sooner or later. True, they can be made, but it's better to buy half a dozen now and have a spare or two left to past on to the younger folks when you pass on.
 

ComCamGuy

Remote Paramedical pain in the ass
If I might suggest the Minimag. It runs on 2 AA batteries. Is bright enough to use around the house, and spotlight the yard, or woods. Easy to carry. Using AA is a real bonus. AA are used in a lot of other items so can scavenge from other items, and if you get rechargeable ones, you can recharge them with a genie, solar, etc... way easy. If you need your hands free you can stick it in your mouth, and if you're sitting in the bathroom it will stand up on it's own.

they have better, smaller ones than the Minimag.
I have carried one of these aaa in my pocket for years. Batteries last forever and it’s brighter than several of my first high end tactical light

 

NoDandy

Has No Life - Lives on TB
cloth pads yes, commercial pads no.

the construction of commercial pads is designed to wick away blood, counterproductive to clotting, the method the body uses to stop bleeding
I have seen some in a sealed up pkg. I figured those would be somewhat sterile. Maybe not. IDK. I know typical battlefield dressings come packed like that, and I assume for the same reason. ???

:ld:
 

ComCamGuy

Remote Paramedical pain in the ass
I have seen some in a sealed up pkg. I figured those would be somewhat sterile. Maybe not. IDK. I know typical battlefield dressings come packed like that, and I assume for the same reason. ???

:ld:
the problem is in what they do rather than the sterility. Better to use good clean cloth than a maxi pad
 

NoDandy

Has No Life - Lives on TB
they have better, smaller ones than the Minimag.
I have carried one of these aaa in my pocket for years. Batteries last forever and it’s brighter than several of my first high end tactical light

I have several mini lights, from Harbor Freight, 3 - AAA, Led. Come 2 to a pkg for $1.97, in assorted colors. Keep one in each vehicle, one in bathroom, nightstand, etc, carry one with me all the time. Have given them to all the kids, and DW. They are very bright. I love them. Next time I am there, will get more. Great little lights
 

summerthyme

Administrator
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I have seen some in a sealed up pkg. I figured those would be somewhat sterile. Maybe not. IDK. I know typical battlefield dressings come packed like that, and I assume for the same reason. ???

:ld:
Farmers use sanitary pads for expedient dressings on livestock all the time. Place the pad over the wound, and use vet wrap (or direct pressure with your hand) to hold pressure on the bleeder. Unless you severed a major artery, bleeding will stop within a few minutes.

I once got called out for a major wreck between 2 teams of horses... one team had spooked, tried to climb over the piece of machinery ahead of them (driving down the road) and one mare got torn up badly. When I got to the scene, there were probably 20 men standing around this huge draft mare, with puddles of blood everywhere. She was literally pouring blood out of one ankle, despite a tourniquet.

I snipped the tourniquet (it was making things worse, because it was bleeding from veins, not arteries), slapped an ABD pad over the mess and took three tight wraps with vet wrap. Within 3 minutes it stopped dripping.

They used sanitary pads to absorb serum and cover the wound for the 2 months it took to heal.

Summerthyme
 

NoDandy

Has No Life - Lives on TB
Farmers use sanitary pads for expedient dressings on livestock all the time. Place the pad over the wound, and use vet wrap (or direct pressure with your hand) to hold pressure on the bleeder. Unless you severed a major artery, bleeding will stop within a few minutes.

I once got called out for a major wreck between 2 teams of horses... one team had spooked, tried to climb over the piece of machinery ahead of them (driving down the road) and one mare got torn up badly. When I got to the scene, there were probably 20 men standing around this huge draft mare, with puddles of blood everywhere. She was literally pouring blood out of one ankle, despite a tourniquet.

I snipped the tourniquet (it was making things worse, because it was bleeding from veins, not arteries), slapped an ABD pad over the mess and took three tight wraps with vet wrap. Within 3 minutes it stopped dripping.

They used sanitary pads to absorb serum and cover the wound for the 2 months it took to heal.

Summerthyme
Interesting.

What is vet wrap ?
 

summerthyme

Administrator
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Interesting.

What is vet wrap ?
It's a "cohesive" elastic bandage, which sticks to itself, but not to skin or hair. They sell it for humans, for about 5x the price! It's a better, but non-reusable form of ACE bandage. Works really well for sprains, and I've even used it to make a functional soft cast. I keep at least a couple dozen 2" and 4" rolls around, but I've got livestock! A couple in the first aid kit are invaluable.

Summerthyme
 

ComCamGuy

Remote Paramedical pain in the ass
They work great as wound pads but are not the best for initial wound use, and don’t get me started on tampons for bulletholes (plenty of articles out there)
 

Kathy in FL

TB Fanatic
Book: Where there is no dentist
dental adhesive if a crown comes loose
Dental filler available at WallyWorld.
Haven't used it but thinking about looking into clove oil for tooth pain as my dentist told me some of the most common OTC tooth pain medication damages the gums.
A dental kit for cleaning? I've done the dog's teeth but not humans.
Oil of clove works but the taste isn't much better than the OTC stuff. It isn't all that easy to find anymore either.
 

Kathy in FL

TB Fanatic
It's a "cohesive" elastic bandage, which sticks to itself, but not to skin or hair. They sell it for humans, for about 5x the price! It's a better, but non-reusable form of ACE bandage. Works really well for sprains, and I've even used it to make a functional soft cast. I keep at least a couple dozen 2" and 4" rolls around, but I've got livestock! A couple in the first aid kit are invaluable.

Summerthyme
We had to use this on our black lab when she wouldn't stop licking her foot after picking up a sandspur. We got the sandspur out, medicated the resulting ouch but once she started licking we couldn't get her to stop. We wound up having to make a "boot" with that vet wrap when she kept taking off the baby sock. She still tried to take off the vet wrap but we at least managed to keep infection out.
 

NoDandy

Has No Life - Lives on TB
It's a "cohesive" elastic bandage, which sticks to itself, but not to skin or hair. They sell it for humans, for about 5x the price! It's a better, but non-reusable form of ACE bandage. Works really well for sprains, and I've even used it to make a functional soft cast. I keep at least a couple dozen 2" and 4" rolls around, but I've got livestock! A couple in the first aid kit are invaluable.

Summerthyme
OK, I remember years ago my son's cat fell off the roof. His front right leg was "sprained ", not broke. The vet wrapped his leg with that stuff. He did not like it, but finally gave up trying to get it off. After about 5 weeks, he kept at it, and we took it off of him.

Yeah, next time I go to Tractor Supply, will see if they have it, and will get some.

Thanks again !
 

West

Senior nut
I forgot one thing earlier. Remember spare bow strings. A good string will last a long time, but it will fail sooner or later. True, they can be made, but it's better to buy half a dozen now and have a spare or two left to past on to the younger folks when you pass on.
Thanks for reminding me. But for any newbies or thick headed folks, day late is talking bow and arrow strings.

Not these....


But for us and having four musicians in the family, we need to stack both types.
 

CaryC

Veteran Member
Here is the modern version... https://www.amazon.com/HeatnBond-UltraHold-Iron-Adhesive-Inches/dp/B000XAMYXI/ref=sr_1_6?crid=PYZ9CFH4N0U6&dchild=1&keywords=fusible+webbing+for+fabric+applique&qid=1633961041&sprefix=Fusible+webbing,aps,938&sr=8-6

Buy a pack of this stuff, and you'll never spend hours cussing, trying to stitch a patch on the inside of a pair of jeans!

You use better parts of jeans too worn to save for the patch. I actually sent several "ready to apply" iron on patches in denim and khaki with our sons when they went off to college.

If you've got boys, you iron on patches on the knees of their jeans *before* they wear them!

Summerthyme
Back in the day already sewed in reinforced knees was a big selling point.

The thing is with iron on patches they would let loose around the edges/corners. Be running down the sidewalk, and those things would be flapping in the wind. Some how mine eventually just came off. On there own. Without any help from me. And I NEVER picked scabs either.

'Course in this day (the modern age) you could make your patches out of a plaid material over bluejeans/Carhartt, or whatever and it would be cool.
 

summerthyme

Administrator
_______________
We had to use this on our black lab when she wouldn't stop licking her foot after picking up a sandspur. We got the sandspur out, medicated the resulting ouch but once she started licking we couldn't get her to stop. We wound up having to make a "boot" with that vet wrap when she kept taking off the baby sock. She still tried to take off the vet wrap but we at least managed to keep infection out.
They even sell it (in the 2" size) already impregnated with a bitter non-chew flavor!

Summerthyme
 

Roger Thornhill

Some irascible old curmudgeon
Speaking of hauling water, do you have a good, sturdy pail? Plastic buckets are worthless for heavy, daily use. Get a galvanized steel pail with a sturdy handle, or even better, a stainless-steel one.

The stainless pails are frighteningly expensive - almost a hundred dollars. I found one at a yard sale for five bucks, in pristine condition. It's one of my prized preps.
 

Kathy in FL

TB Fanatic
Speaking of hauling water, do you have a good, sturdy pail? Plastic buckets are worthless for heavy, daily use. Get a galvanized steel pail with a sturdy handle, or even better, a stainless-steel one.

The stainless pails are frighteningly expensive - almost a hundred dollars. I found one at a yard sale for five bucks, in pristine condition. It's one of my prized preps.
metal pails are easier to sanitize as well.
 

NoDandy

Has No Life - Lives on TB
Yeah... I only use stainless steel for milk. I do have to disagree as to the "worthlessness " of the standard 5 gallon pail. *kept out of the sun*, they'll last for many years. DS was laughing about how he couldn't imagine farming or homesteading without 5 gallon pails!

Summerthyme
We keep a couple of buckets of water outside for the pups & kitties. Went through several galvanized ones after bottom rusted holes. Went to Tactor Supply to get a couple more. guy there suggested some plastic ones they had. Told me he used them for his dogs, and said they did not freeze. They are about 2 gal size. I have had them for several years now, no problems. Just rinse them out every now & then. No rust, no freeze. I do not know what they are called, but seem to be fairly sturdy, not like your typical plastic bucket, but still somewhat flexible. I would buy again !

:ld:
 

Seeker22

Veteran Member
Lol, sewing needles and thread. Sewing machines won't work if they don't have electricity to run them. And torn clothes aren't much fun in cold weather. And get some of the ones with large 'eyes', too. If the need should arise, you can use them to 'repair' your footwear.
Oh yes, they will. My EcoFlow River should fire up the sewing machines just fine. That's the plan anyway.
 

mikeabn

Finally not a lurker!
Menstrual Pads .

Someone correct me if I am wrong, but would those be good to use if someone has a bad bleeding wound, such as a cut, gun shot, etc ?
I understand paramedics carry them for this reason but I don't know first hand.
 

Keric4

Contributing Member
Book: Where there is no dentist
dental adhesive if a crown comes loose
Dental filler available at WallyWorld.
Haven't used it but thinking about looking into clove oil for tooth pain as my dentist told me some of the most common OTC tooth pain medication damages the gums.
A dental kit for cleaning? I've done the dog's teeth but not humans.
[/QUOTE/

Oil of Oregano (Oreganol) and Colloidal Silver have given me much relief, when I had a tooth infection.
 

summerthyme

Administrator
_______________
We keep a couple of buckets of water outside for the pups & kitties. Went through several galvanized ones after bottom rusted holes. Went to Tactor Supply to get a couple more. guy there suggested some plastic ones they had. Told me he used them for his dogs, and said they did not freeze. They are about 2 gal size. I have had them for several years now, no problems. Just rinse them out every now & then. No rust, no freeze. I do not know what they are called, but seem to be fairly sturdy, not like your typical plastic bucket, but still somewhat flexible. I would buy again !

:ld:
The really nearly indestructible ones are the Fortex rubber pans and buckets. We've got some that are over 30 years old. They aren't pretty, but they hold up for years. Their only drawback is pigs will eat them!

Summerthyme
 
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day late

money? whats that?
Speaking of hauling water, do you have a good, sturdy pail? Plastic buckets are worthless for heavy, daily use. Get a galvanized steel pail with a sturdy handle, or even better, a stainless-steel one.

The stainless pails are frighteningly expensive - almost a hundred dollars. I found one at a yard sale for five bucks, in pristine condition. It's one of my prized preps.
Old G.I. canvas buckets are worth a thought as well. They last just about forever and when empty, fold flat for easier storage.
 

Marseydoats

Senior Member
Back in the day already sewed in reinforced knees was a big selling point.

The thing is with iron on patches they would let loose around the edges/corners. Be running down the sidewalk, and those things would be flapping in the wind. Some how mine eventually just came off. On there own. Without any help from me. And I NEVER picked scabs either.

'Course in this day (the modern age) you could make your patches out of a plaid material over bluejeans/Carhartt, or whatever and it would be cool.
Mom always ironed on, then sewed the edges. I've always been really rough on clothes.
 
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