PREP Overlooked Preps

ComCamGuy

Remote Paramedical pain in the ass
My new-to-me frame Kelty back-pack arrived today. I chose one with an enormous capacity. Was worried the frame would be too large for my torso, but it is very comfortable. Ultralight and synthetics are fashionable, and do have their place, but I think woolens have a better track record if one is around open fires, as opposed to camp stoves. I wanted a lot of capacity for bulky warm coverings incase I ended up camping in winter.

Turns out, I forgot about ordering cinch straps for the sleeping bag - so that is an overlooked prep. I guess twine will do for now. Knots suitable for cinching twine? I'll need to watch some YouTubes (Corporal's Corner channel has some good lessons on camping knots). Knot skills are another overlooked prep for me.
thin bungee cords. They work great to hold the bag to the frame, and also to hold up tarps for shelters and go up quickly

i have some British Basha shelter tarps in the emergency bags for shelter. In each of their storage bags I have half a dozen 36” bungee cords. I can put up a tarp shelter in about two minutes if I’m in some trees and taking my time.
 
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AlaskaSue

North to the Future
My new-to-me frame Kelty back-pack arrived today. I chose one with an enormous capacity. Was worried the frame would be too large for my torso, but it is very comfortable. Ultralight and synthetics are fashionable, and do have their place, but I think woolens have a better track record if one is around open fires, as opposed to camp stoves. I wanted a lot of capacity for bulky warm coverings incase I ended up camping in winter.

Turns out, I forgot about ordering cinch straps for the sleeping bag - so that is an overlooked prep. I guess twine will do for now. Knots suitable for cinching twine? I'll need to watch some YouTubes (Corporal's Corner channel has some good lessons on camping knots). Knot skills are another overlooked prep for me.
Cheap? I just priced them…they are $32 for a small pack of the small pads! Yow
 

Caplock50

I am the Winter Warrior
Screen repair kit. If shtf and no AC ya'll are gonna want good screens to keep the skitters out.
If it's a wire screen they're easily sewn up with just a single strand of the wire from an old screen. If it's just 'slash-like' hole, 'stitch' it up like a slash in a pair of pants. If it's a 'hole', cut a square 'patch' from the old screen and remove 2 strands of wire from each of the 4 sides. Then on all 4 sides of the patch, bend those wire end up 90° of the patch. Then stick them through the screen with the hole in it and straighten them back out. The hole is now patched.
 

Caplock50

I am the Winter Warrior
Non-battery powered watches for your entire group. Who cares what time it is in the apocalypse? Well, when you tell your scout to go one hour that way then wait for the attack in two hours and so on and so forth.

edited to add

and for real fun and opsec, synchronize your watches completely dissimilar to local time to encode radio references. The watches are to keep the group on time primarily

example: noon becomes 0417 on group time
If it's getting late in the day and you want to know, within a few minutes, how long it is until the sun goes down...use your fist. At arm's length your fist equals 30 minutes...so if the sun is 2 fists up from the horizon...you have 1 hour before the sun starts to set...about an hour and a half before dark.
 

Caplock50

I am the Winter Warrior
Menstrual Pads .

Someone correct me if I am wrong, but would those be good to use if someone has a bad bleeding wound, such as a cut, gun shot, etc ?
I believe I've read somewhere a good while ago that they could be used for such.
 

briches

Veteran Member
I haven’t read all the replies so apologize if there are some repeats. Some random things that come to mind include: large safety pins, extra lip balm, super glue, duct tape, eye glass repair kit, work and winter gloves, hair ties, hot pads, fly swatters, aluminum foil, dental floss, extra toothbrushes, dish soap, zip ties, binder clips, extra rope, a couple of sturdy buckets, hand lotion, extra can opener,

Much of this can be purchased at the dollar tree. Get it while you can and while it’s $1.00
 
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Tex88

Veteran Member
If it's getting late in the day and you want to know, within a few minutes, how long it is until the sun goes down...use your fist. At arm's length your fist equals 30 minutes...so if the sun is 2 fists up from the horizon...you have 1 hour before the sun starts to set...about an hour and a half before dark.
That’s making a lot of assumptions about peoples’ arm lengths, fist sizes and latitudes.
 

Caplock50

I am the Winter Warrior
Don't forget something to sharpen the axe. YouTube had videos on how to use the Lansky puck, and using the swede side of a belt with grit paste for honing knives. Watched many last year - I need to go back and review.
A piece of red clay brick can be used to sharpen an ax or hatchet. And just a plain, regular leather belt can be used to hone a knife. That 'grit paste' may make it work faster and/or better, but it's not really necessary. As my Dad taught me, about 5 decades ago, "If it'll dull a knife; it'll sharpen a knife". I've got a small piece of pine 2X4 setting next to my computer so I can sharpen my knife to razor sharpness. Oh and when sharpening/stropping a knife, roll the blade over on its back, not the 'cutting edge'. Without realizing it, when you end the stroke and lift the blade from the whetrock, you roll the edge off of it.
 
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Milkweed Host

Veteran Member
For the house, extra roofing and nails in case of roofing damage.
Large heavy duty tarp and lots of rope in case you have to cover a damaged roof.
Roofing tar for small holes.

Plywood and screws if you have to cover windows.
 

Milkweed Host

Veteran Member
Menards has tire repair kits along with CO2 cartridges.
I've watched the Youtube videos on using these kits.

I've place two kits in each vehicle, which gives me six CO2 cartridges.
I don't think these cartridges were meant to fill a large full sized flat tire,
but it should work for a low tire with an object/nail in it.
 

Tex88

Veteran Member
Back in the olden days when fire starter was one of those hard to obtain items, floor wax served in a pinch. Put some on your log, light with loooooong match, presto, fire.
Same effect as lighter fluid but much easier and safer to handle.
 

Caplock50

I am the Winter Warrior
That’s making a lot of assumptions about peoples’ arm lengths, fist sizes and latitudes.
I'm not the only one that's saying that. There's a whole bunch of 'extreme' outdoors men that say it, too. Look 'em up on the net. It works...try it.
 

Marie

Veteran Member
We keep a couple of buckets of water outside for the pups & kitties. Went through several galvanized ones after bottom rusted holes. Went to Tactor Supply to get a couple more. guy there suggested some plastic ones they had. Told me he used them for his dogs, and said they did not freeze. They are about 2 gal size. I have had them for several years now, no problems. Just rinse them out every now & then. No rust, no freeze. I do not know what they are called, but seem to be fairly sturdy, not like your typical plastic bucket, but still somewhat flexible. I would buy again !

:ld:
Oh please send me a link or picture of these!
 

Caplock50

I am the Winter Warrior
If you plan to heat your home with a wood burning stove...stock up on a goodly amount of 'rich lighter' or 'lighter pine' wood. It burns almost like a candle. And a handful of shavings will get your fire up and going real quick and easy. With 'rich lighter', there's no need of any kind of 'lighter fluid'...
 

Ping Jockey

Veteran Member
In an emergency when you got nothing else. Since we’re prepping, get proper wound dressing materials instead of stashing tampons in case you need them for wounds.
Yes, since we are prepping some folks may not have access to quikclot, Israeli bandages, HyFin chest seal kits, or perhaps even a suture kit. Tampons can be used, and have been used many times, to stem the flow of blood from a deep puncture wound when nothing else is available. They’re cheap, readily available, and used successfully until further treatment can be had.

Which is, and of course I could be mistaken, the whole idea of prepping; to utilize what one has available at the moment to save lives. Whether it be food, water treatment, clothing, shelter, weapons, caches, spare tires, a gen set, solar panels, or a box of tampons. I’ll stash whatever the bloody hell I think will serve a future need.
 

Tex88

Veteran Member
Yes, since we are prepping some folks may not have access to quikclot, Israeli bandages, HyFin chest seal kits, or perhaps even a suture kit. Tampons can be used, and have been used many times, to stem the flow of blood from a deep puncture wound when nothing else is available. They’re cheap, readily available, and used successfully until further treatment can be had.

Which is, and of course I could be mistaken, the whole idea of prepping; to utilize what one has available at the moment to save lives. Whether it be food, water treatment, clothing, shelter, weapons, caches, spare tires, a gen set, solar panels, or a box of tampons. I’ll stash whatever the bloody hell I think will serve a future need.
Reign in that high horse of yours. Box of 32 tampons costs about as much as a basic first aid kit that will serve you better. You go and stash whatever you wanna stash.
 

Quiet Man

Nothing unreal exists
  • Spare belts for your sewing machines
  • Reverse Osmosis membranes
  • Spare well controller/box
  • Lantern mantles
  • Multi-B vitamins
  • DC-DC Buck/Boost converters (convert voltage for small electrical devices)
  • Povidone Iodine
 
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Ping Jockey

Veteran Member
Reign in that high horse of yours. Box of 32 tampons costs about as much as a basic first aid kit that will serve you better. You go and stash whatever you wanna stash.
Well there pardner, I do believe my high horse is usually a pretty sweet paint stallion who happens to be a far better judge of character with regards to humans than I could ever hope to be. He’s been known to take a bite out of folks he has no hankering to be around.

That said, your basic first aid kit is just that; basic. Bandaids, some 4x4 gauze pads, tape, and an array of feel good items. A deep puncture wound takes far more than a few gauze pads and some tape to stem the flow of blood. The use of a tampon for such needs is one of many things that can be used. It is an expedient item that can be found just about anywhere and can be used by just about anyone with little or no medical training.

It was a suggestion. I’ve seen it used in a previous life and it worked amazingly well. So well in fact we were able to finish stabilizing the victim without them having bled out.

A suggestion only...
 

ComCamGuy

Remote Paramedical pain in the ass
Yes, since we are prepping some folks may not have access to quikclot, Israeli bandages, HyFin chest seal kits, or perhaps even a suture kit. Tampons can be used, and have been used many times, to stem the flow of blood from a deep puncture wound when nothing else is available. They’re cheap, readily available, and used successfully until further treatment can be had.

Which is, and of course I could be mistaken, the whole idea of prepping; to utilize what one has available at the moment to save lives. Whether it be food, water treatment, clothing, shelter, weapons, caches, spare tires, a gen set, solar panels, or a box of tampons. I’ll stash whatever the bloody hell I think will serve a future need.
absolutely not. A tampon has a4x4 of gauze in it and is useless. A roll of kerlex and a simple pencil would be much better

dont take just my word. I will post more from my work computer where I have a ton of files

so, take this guys words

Andrew D. Fisher is now a medical student at Texas A&M College of Medicine after serving many years as a physician assistant with the U.S. Army. He joined the Army in 1993 as a Light Infantryman and spent three years at 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment before leaving the Army to pursue a college education. He is a 2006 graduate of the Interservice Physician Assistant Program. His previous assignments as a PA include UNCSB-JSA (Republic of Korea) and 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment. He has deployed seven times in support of the Global War on Terror/OCO. Andrew has taken care of more patients in the 75th Ranger Regiment than any other person since October 2001 and is the 2010 Army PA of the Year. Known as Old Man River, he is always angry, irritable, and cynical; at least it appears that way. He considers himself to be the least talented writer for the Havok Journal, but is very appreciative to have the opportunity. In his spare time he enjoys… who are we kidding, he has no spare time.

Your “Tactical Tampon” is Useless for Life-Threatening Hemorrhage
February 22, 2020 by Andrew Fisher

Your “Tactical Tampon” is Useless for Life-Threatening Hemorrhage
by Andrew Fisher
The myth that tampons can quell life-threatening hemorrhage just won’t die.
ngcb1
“Tactical tampon:” you never know when you might need one!
It seems that every other week a post on social media touts the amazing effects of tampons as a life-saving intervention (LSI). After all, there are anecdotes from Iraq, Afghanistan, and the veteran favorite “back in my day” story.
My favorite tampon evidence comes from the always “unbiased”Snopes.com. Here we have “proof” tampons work as a LSI. Nothing says unbiased evidence like a third-party…maybe even fourth-party letter written to mom from a war zone. Snope’s story is full of unsubstantiated information, yet it is a common reference for the Tampon Truthers. Even Snopes admits this story is “Undetermined.”
Then, one can find the fringe of the Internet who also assert tampon effectiveness. Bioprepper claims tampons are “designed
ngcb1
Sanitary napkin, not a tampon. Courtesy: http://www.period.media/factsf
to be ultra absorbent” and “can be used to plug a bullet hole until…accounts of this use date back to World War I.” However, this should all be thrown out the window of truthfulness with this: “Many items in modern society were first developed as a facet of military research – tampons being a prime example.”
No, no, and no.
Tampons have been around for many thousands of years, for, you’ll never guess—vaginal bleeding. In the age of every bit of information at your fingertips, why rely on conjecture and #fakenews as truth? Some have stated tampons were used during World War I and II. I have yet to find definitive information tampons were used as treatments for life-threatening wounds. However, Kimberly-Clark, which produces Kotex® did make and provide Cellucotton, an absorbent wadding made of wood pulp as bandages—which are bandages, not tampons. During World War 1, field nurses discovered that Cellucotton worked well as a disposable feminine napkin.
After the war
, Kimberly-Clark began making sanitary napkins from
ngcb1
Cellucotton. It was not until 1940s that many companies made tampons. Another tampon story says nurses made their own tampons during World War I. During World War II, “production of cotton bandages and surgical dressings for the U.S. military now took place alongside the tampon assembly lines.” The only information found was the use of tampons in the “1st century” for bullet wounds. I found that interesting because I was not aware of firearms in the 1st Century.
Enough of the background and history. Let’s talk science. There is no evidence to support the use of tampons. There is no study, no data, nothing but Internet anecdotes to support this ongoing heresy. Anecdotes and letters to mom is not science or comes close to evidence to support tampon use.
ngcb1
Tampon meme. Courtesy: Eric Totel
Why don’t tampons work? It’s actually not that difficult. When bullets enter the body, while the entrance is small, they create a larger area inside due to the bullet’s energy. This cavitation can be large, but more devastating that the soft tissue damage from the bullet’s energy, is an arterial injury.
svg+xml,%3Csvg%20xmlns%3D%22http%3A%2F%2Fwww
The synergy between fragmentation and cavitation results in detachment of pieces of muscle and increases the permanent-cavity dimensions. Courtesy: Martin L Fackler, Gunshot Wound Review, Annals of Emergency Medicine, Volume 28, Issue 2, 1996, Pages 194-203
Massive bleeding from an artery in an extremity is a life-threating wound and also a preventable death. This is a significant issue, not only for the US military, but also the citizen of our nation. Of the 147,000 trauma deaths in 2014, 20% or 30,000 were potentially survivable. Many of these were due to bleeding from an extremity.
A tampon cannot provide the surface area or the pressure to control massive bleeding. Tampons absorb blood, not provide any hemostatic assistance. The average tampon can absorb 9 mL of blood, or about two teaspoons. This will not stop life-threatening bleeding. While a hemostatic dressing is preferred to control massive bleeding, regular gauze may be used, but it needs to be in sufficient amount. Based on square inches, a tampon has the surface area about 4 square inches.
svg+xml,%3Csvg%20xmlns%3D%22http%3A%2F%2Fwww
11 tampons in a GSW model. Courtesy: Eric S.
A hemostatic dressing is a gauze type dressing, impregnated with hemostatic agents, z-folded and compressed. It’s surface area is over 400 square inches, this is a significant difference. If you think the ¼ inch depth of the tampon makes a difference, again, it holds 9 mL. Furthermore, the hemostatic dressing actually helps with clotting. Each dressing has a different mechanism.
A search of peer-reviewed medical literature will fail to provide you with any data on tampon use. This is likely, because no physician or researcher worth their $200,000 degree would waste their time studying something that is obviously inferior to tourniquets or hemostatic agents.

What about bullets cauterizing wounds? According to Fackler: “On occasion one still hears the myth that bullets reach such a high temperature in the gun barrel that they are sterilized by being fired. This was proved false by kaGarde in 1892.”
But, the other argument is, what happens when you run out of supplies. In what situation would you either preferentially pack tampons over proven medical equipment or find yourself be naked? The latter being, clothing of any type would be superior to tampons, by the amount of surface area.
Others argue they carry tampons for females. That’s cute, but it is not a medic responsibility on a combat mission. If you are in an aid station and you only have tampons left, you failed to plan properly. You will still be more successful using clothing over tampons. The American College of Surgeons recommends, when you do not have a hemostatic dressing, sterile dressings, or a tourniquet, use clothing to pack wound. This can be a shirt, pants, socks, preferably clean, but your clothing covered in body sweat, provides more than a tampon.
svg+xml,%3Csvg%20xmlns%3D%22http%3A%2F%2Fwww
Tampon vs QuickClot Combat Gauze

svg+xml,%3Csvg%20xmlns%3D%22http%3A%2F%2Fwww
Tampon vs Hemostatic Dressing

It is clear, that the tampon argument is based off passed down unverified anecdotes. The claims of “tampon truthers” are dangerous and need to be dismissed. Honestly, we probably need a study demonstrating their failure to make some headway.
This first appeared in The Havok Journal February 12, 2019 and represents the personal opinion of the author and is not necessarily representative of the views of any other party, and is not intended to serve as medical advice
 

ComCamGuy

Remote Paramedical pain in the ass
Well there pardner, I do believe my high horse is usually a pretty sweet paint stallion who happens to be a far better judge of character with regards to humans than I could ever hope to be. He’s been known to take a bite out of folks he has no hankering to be around.

That said, your basic first aid kit is just that; basic. Bandaids, some 4x4 gauze pads, tape, and an array of feel good items. A deep puncture wound takes far more than a few gauze pads and some tape to stem the flow of blood. The use of a tampon for such needs is one of many things that can be used. It is an expedient item that can be found just about anywhere and can be used by just about anyone with little or no medical training.

It was a suggestion. I’ve seen it used in a previous life and it worked amazingly well. So well in fact we were able to finish stabilizing the victim without them having bled out.

A suggestion only...
normally it’s an issue of surviving in spite of what we do, and that is most of the time with tampons
 

helen

Panic Sex Lady
Pens, pencils, and lined paper! So many people don't write anything anymore- they keep their shopping lists on the phone, text messages rather than write notes, and in general, don't see much need for writing implements. If the grid goes down, that will change fast!

Also, all those little things we take for granted... duct tape, stapler and staples, rubber bands, safety pins...

Summerthyme
I just put together all that and some art supplies for kids a few days ago. School supplies were on clearance.
 

helen

Panic Sex Lady
Well there pardner, I do believe my high horse is usually a pretty sweet paint stallion who happens to be a far better judge of character with regards to humans than I could ever hope to be. He’s been known to take a bite out of folks he has no hankering to be around.

That said, your basic first aid kit is just that; basic. Bandaids, some 4x4 gauze pads, tape, and an array of feel good items. A deep puncture wound takes far more than a few gauze pads and some tape to stem the flow of blood. The use of a tampon for such needs is one of many things that can be used. It is an expedient item that can be found just about anywhere and can be used by just about anyone with little or no medical training.

It was a suggestion. I’ve seen it used in a previous life and it worked amazingly well. So well in fact we were able to finish stabilizing the victim without them having bled out.

A suggestion only...
You have a horse?
 

heelgeneral

Contributing Member
Nicotine gum if you're a smoker or smokeless tobacco user (like me). It has a good shelf life of 2-3 years. I use it to help me get through the work day and keep a good long term supply.
 

Ping Jockey

Veteran Member
absolutely not. A tampon has a4x4 of gauze in it and is useless. A roll of kerlex and a simple pencil would be much better

dont take just my word. I will post more from my work computer where I have a ton of files

so, take this guys words

Andrew D. Fisher is now a medical student at Texas A&M College of Medicine after serving many years as a physician assistant with the U.S. Army. He joined the Army in 1993 as a Light Infantryman and spent three years at 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment before leaving the Army to pursue a college education. He is a 2006 graduate of the Interservice Physician Assistant Program. His previous assignments as a PA include UNCSB-JSA (Republic of Korea) and 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment. He has deployed seven times in support of the Global War on Terror/OCO. Andrew has taken care of more patients in the 75th Ranger Regiment than any other person since October 2001 and is the 2010 Army PA of the Year. Known as Old Man River, he is always angry, irritable, and cynical; at least it appears that way. He considers himself to be the least talented writer for the Havok Journal, but is very appreciative to have the opportunity. In his spare time he enjoys… who are we kidding, he has no spare time.

Your “Tactical Tampon” is Useless for Life-Threatening Hemorrhage
February 22, 2020 by Andrew Fisher

Your “Tactical Tampon” is Useless for Life-Threatening Hemorrhage
by Andrew Fisher
The myth that tampons can quell life-threatening hemorrhage just won’t die.
ngcb1
“Tactical tampon:” you never know when you might need one!
It seems that every other week a post on social media touts the amazing effects of tampons as a life-saving intervention (LSI). After all, there are anecdotes from Iraq, Afghanistan, and the veteran favorite “back in my day” story.
My favorite tampon evidence comes from the always “unbiased”Snopes.com. Here we have “proof” tampons work as a LSI. Nothing says unbiased evidence like a third-party…maybe even fourth-party letter written to mom from a war zone. Snope’s story is full of unsubstantiated information, yet it is a common reference for the Tampon Truthers. Even Snopes admits this story is “Undetermined.”
Then, one can find the fringe of the Internet who also assert tampon effectiveness. Bioprepper claims tampons are “designed
ngcb1
Sanitary napkin, not a tampon. Courtesy: http://www.period.media/factsf
to be ultra absorbent” and “can be used to plug a bullet hole until…accounts of this use date back to World War I.” However, this should all be thrown out the window of truthfulness with this: “Many items in modern society were first developed as a facet of military research – tampons being a prime example.”
No, no, and no.
Tampons have been around for many thousands of years, for, you’ll never guess—vaginal bleeding. In the age of every bit of information at your fingertips, why rely on conjecture and #fakenews as truth? Some have stated tampons were used during World War I and II. I have yet to find definitive information tampons were used as treatments for life-threatening wounds. However, Kimberly-Clark, which produces Kotex® did make and provide Cellucotton, an absorbent wadding made of wood pulp as bandages—which are bandages, not tampons. During World War 1, field nurses discovered that Cellucotton worked well as a disposable feminine napkin.
After the war
, Kimberly-Clark began making sanitary napkins from
ngcb1
Cellucotton. It was not until 1940s that many companies made tampons. Another tampon story says nurses made their own tampons during World War I. During World War II, “production of cotton bandages and surgical dressings for the U.S. military now took place alongside the tampon assembly lines.” The only information found was the use of tampons in the “1st century” for bullet wounds. I found that interesting because I was not aware of firearms in the 1st Century.
Enough of the background and history. Let’s talk science. There is no evidence to support the use of tampons. There is no study, no data, nothing but Internet anecdotes to support this ongoing heresy. Anecdotes and letters to mom is not science or comes close to evidence to support tampon use.
ngcb1
Tampon meme. Courtesy: Eric Totel
Why don’t tampons work? It’s actually not that difficult. When bullets enter the body, while the entrance is small, they create a larger area inside due to the bullet’s energy. This cavitation can be large, but more devastating that the soft tissue damage from the bullet’s energy, is an arterial injury.
svg+xml,%3Csvg%20xmlns%3D%22http%3A%2F%2Fwww
The synergy between fragmentation and cavitation results in detachment of pieces of muscle and increases the permanent-cavity dimensions. Courtesy: Martin L Fackler, Gunshot Wound Review, Annals of Emergency Medicine, Volume 28, Issue 2, 1996, Pages 194-203
Massive bleeding from an artery in an extremity is a life-threating wound and also a preventable death. This is a significant issue, not only for the US military, but also the citizen of our nation. Of the 147,000 trauma deaths in 2014, 20% or 30,000 were potentially survivable. Many of these were due to bleeding from an extremity.
A tampon cannot provide the surface area or the pressure to control massive bleeding. Tampons absorb blood, not provide any hemostatic assistance. The average tampon can absorb 9 mL of blood, or about two teaspoons. This will not stop life-threatening bleeding. While a hemostatic dressing is preferred to control massive bleeding, regular gauze may be used, but it needs to be in sufficient amount. Based on square inches, a tampon has the surface area about 4 square inches.
svg+xml,%3Csvg%20xmlns%3D%22http%3A%2F%2Fwww
11 tampons in a GSW model. Courtesy: Eric S.
A hemostatic dressing is a gauze type dressing, impregnated with hemostatic agents, z-folded and compressed. It’s surface area is over 400 square inches, this is a significant difference. If you think the ¼ inch depth of the tampon makes a difference, again, it holds 9 mL. Furthermore, the hemostatic dressing actually helps with clotting. Each dressing has a different mechanism.
A search of peer-reviewed medical literature will fail to provide you with any data on tampon use. This is likely, because no physician or researcher worth their $200,000 degree would waste their time studying something that is obviously inferior to tourniquets or hemostatic agents.

What about bullets cauterizing wounds? According to Fackler: “On occasion one still hears the myth that bullets reach such a high temperature in the gun barrel that they are sterilized by being fired. This was proved false by kaGarde in 1892.”
But, the other argument is, what happens when you run out of supplies. In what situation would you either preferentially pack tampons over proven medical equipment or find yourself be naked? The latter being, clothing of any type would be superior to tampons, by the amount of surface area.
Others argue they carry tampons for females. That’s cute, but it is not a medic responsibility on a combat mission. If you are in an aid station and you only have tampons left, you failed to plan properly. You will still be more successful using clothing over tampons. The American College of Surgeons recommends, when you do not have a hemostatic dressing, sterile dressings, or a tourniquet, use clothing to pack wound. This can be a shirt, pants, socks, preferably clean, but your clothing covered in body sweat, provides more than a tampon.
svg+xml,%3Csvg%20xmlns%3D%22http%3A%2F%2Fwww
Tampon vs QuickClot Combat Gauze

svg+xml,%3Csvg%20xmlns%3D%22http%3A%2F%2Fwww
Tampon vs Hemostatic Dressing

It is clear, that the tampon argument is based off passed down unverified anecdotes. The claims of “tampon truthers” are dangerous and need to be dismissed. Honestly, we probably need a study demonstrating their failure to make some headway.
This first appeared in The Havok Journal February 12, 2019 and represents the personal opinion of the author and is not necessarily representative of the views of any other party, and is not intended to serve as medical advice
Are there any other types of puncture wounds besides GSW’s?
 

hiwall

Veteran Member
Go to a dollar store for some cheap foam flip-flops in the large size. Use them as insoles in boots to add insulation for those cold nights standing on guard duty. Use them in boots or shoes that are too big to make them fit better. No shoes? Use the them inside easy-to-make moccasins to help protect your feet. The large size can be cut down to any smaller size.
 
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