DISASTER 'Hundreds' of New Yorkers may already be infected with polio, Empire state health chief warns

Publius

TB Fanatic
My grandfather had this when he was just a kid (late 1920s) and some how came out of ok just one leg was a little skinnier.
Come 1942 at age 17 he enlisted with the Marine Corp and was almost rejected for this and said it never stopped him from doing what he wanted to do, so if I allowed to give basic training a try? The guy looked at the doc and doc said yes and they told my grandfather we need more like you and best of luck.
Many months later a man that had Polio as a kid helped liberate Guam (U.S. soil) from the Japanese.
 
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sssarawolf

Has No Life - Lives on TB
This is what happens when people when people are let into the country who are allowed into the country who have not been vaccinated against things like this. Polio was gone form us, not now and what else will make a come back? Besides things that go with filth as folks are allowed to potty anywhere they want to. This is even happening in stores these days.
 

mecoastie

Veteran Member
My folks have a letter from my grandfather written in 1949. He is in St Louis visiting his brother in a polio ward. It describes the isolation and everything. And also the fear in the local population. My great uncle never walked again.

THis is yet another sign of our urban areas falling into 3rd world status.
 

Redcat

Veteran Member
Hubby had polio as a kid, it was before the vaccine. He spent weeks in the hospital.

His auntie who lived two states away also had it as a child. She didn't fare so well. She walked with two canes and had one withered leg.

Hubby has one leg that is a little bit smaller than the other, but you hardly notice it. But his gait is stiff. He also is absolutely not flexible. He could never get down on the floor in a sitting position and get up without help.
 

ktrapper

Veteran Member
As we fall further and further into 3rd world status diseases we thought were irradiated will make a come back.
When power grids go down for days maybe longer sanitation goes does down.
The food supply is becoming increasingly more and more unhealthy.
I could keep going but it’s nothing we here don’t know already.
Best be stocking up on meds to save your family from these kinds things as best you can.
As we slip further into the third world abyss medical care may become spotty.
Learn all you can now.
Medical is one of the most important facets of long term survival.
 

Betty_Rose

Veteran Member
There was the Cutter Incident…


On April 12, 1955, following the announcement of the success of the polio vaccine trial, Cutter Laboratories became one of several companies that was recommended to be given a license by the United States government to produce Salk's polio vaccine. In anticipation of the demand for vaccine, the companies had already produced stocks of the vaccine and these were issued once the licenses were signed.

In what became known as the Cutter incident, some lots of the Cutter vaccine—despite passing required safety tests—contained live polio virus in what was supposed to be an inactivated-virus vaccine.

Cutter withdrew its vaccine from the market on April 27 after vaccine-associated cases were reported.

The mistake produced 120,000 doses of polio vaccine that contained live polio virus. Of children who received the vaccine, 40,000 developed abortive poliomyelitis (a form of the disease that does not involve the central nervous system), 56 developed paralytic poliomyelitis—and of these, five children died from polio.[2]

The exposures led to an epidemic of polio in the families and communities of the affected children, resulting in a further 113 people paralyzed and 5 deaths.[3] The director of the microbiology institute lost his job, as did the equivalent of the assistant secretary for health. Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare Oveta Culp Hobby stepped down. Dr William H. Sebrell Jr, the director of the NIH, resigned.[4]
 

CaryC

Has No Life - Lives on TB
Had an aunt that had it, back around WWII used home made crutches to get around. She birthed a child, and he is in his 80's and lives down the road from me.

TB is also making a come back, had another aunt that had that, and survived. Barely
 

mecoastie

Veteran Member
My wife’s cousin’s little girl got polio from the vaccine. It was confirm by their doctor not just here say. She still walks with a limp to this day.
I’m not saying the vaccine isn't effective but that turned that family against them.
IIRC at one point they were talking about ending the polio vax for everyone as more people were getting the disease from the vax than in the wild. They were talking about going to a targeted system where they would blanket vax an area if a case popped up.
 

mecoastie

Veteran Member
As we fall further and further into 3rd world status diseases we thought were irradiated will make a come back.
When power grids go down for days maybe longer sanitation goes does down.
The food supply is becoming increasingly more and more unhealthy.
I could keep going but it’s nothing we here don’t know already.
Best be stocking up on meds to save your family from these kinds things as best you can.
As we slip further into the third world abyss medical care may become spotty.
Learn all you can now.
Medical is one of the most important facets of long term survival.
Reminds me of the part in Alas Babylon where cholera pops up again in the river.
 

CaryC

Has No Life - Lives on TB
My wife’s cousin’s little girl got polio from the vaccine. It was confirm by their doctor not just here say. She still walks with a limp to this day.
I’m not saying the vaccine isn't effective but that turned that family against them.
Actually the first vaccine that came out, and has been confirmed, did give people polio. The inventor, denied it, and to prove it, gave the vaccine to his family, within, I think 2 years, his entire family had died from polio.

There are several articles online if you want to check it out.

I looked at it when the covid vax was coming out so fast.
 

Kathy in FL

TB Fanatic
My maternal uncle had polio bad enough to leave him with a mild limp. He was still a paratrooper in Vietnam. Nuthin' stops a farm boy. On the other hand, those chemicals defoliants they sprayed while he was parashooting into Vietnam eventually came back and killed him. Bug vs. gov intervention ... most people would be wise just to take the bug.
 

pauldingbabe

The Great Cat
My Grandfather had polio. One leg was a full inch shorter than the other and he walked with a severe gait.

He was a steel walker, raised tobacco, hell, and a bottle. He was always embarrassed by his gait. I'm sure kids in school were, well kids are mean.

Anyways He also was not allowed to go into military service. So that was another blow to the ego.

He had a heart attack and died in his sleep at 60. Being a ragging alcoholic didn't help any.

My Grandmother was in a TB sanatorium for 9 months TOTAL isolation.

:(
 

Mprepared

Veteran Member

Polio in US, UK and Israel reveals rare risk of oral vaccine​

LONDON (AP) — For years, global health officials have used billions of drops of an oral vaccine in a remarkably effective campaign aimed at wiping out polio in its last remaining strongholds — typically, poor, politically unstable corners of the world.

Now, in a surprising twist in the decades-long effort to eradicate the virus, authorities in Jerusalem, New York and London have discovered evidence that polio is spreading there.

The original source of the virus? The oral vaccine itself.

Scientists have long known about this extremely rare phenomenon. That is why some countries have switched to other polio vaccines. But these incidental infections from the oral formula are becoming more glaring as the world inches closer to eradication of the disease and the number of polio cases caused by the wild, or naturally circulating, virus plummets.

Since 2017, there have been 396 cases of polio caused by the wild virus, versus more than 2,600 linked to the oral vaccine, according to figures from the World Health Organization and its partners.

“We are basically replacing the wild virus with the virus in the vaccine, which is now leading to new outbreaks,” said Scott Barrett, a Columbia University professor who has studied polio eradication. “I would assume that countries like the U.K. and the U.S. will be able to stop transmission quite quickly, but we also thought that about monkeypox.”

The latest incidents represent the first time in several years that vaccine-connected polio virus has turned up in rich countries.

Earlier this year, officials in Israel detected polio in an unvaccinated 3-year-old, who suffered paralysis. Several other children, nearly all of them unvaccinated, were found to have the virus but no symptoms.

In June, British authorities reported finding evidence in sewage that the virus was spreading, though no infections in people were identified. Last week, the government said all children in London ages 1 to 9 would be offered a booster shot.

In the U.S., an unvaccinated young adult suffered paralysis in his legs after being infected with polio, New York officials revealed last month. The virus has also shown up in New York sewers, suggesting it is spreading. But officials said they are not planning a booster campaign because they believe the state's high vaccination rate should offer enough protection.

Genetic analyses showed that the viruses in the three countries were all “vaccine-derived,” meaning that they were mutated versions of a virus that originated in the oral vaccine.

The oral vaccine at issue has been used since 1988 because it is cheap, easy to administer — two drops are put directly into children's mouths — and better at protecting entire populations where polio is spreading. It contains a weakened form of the live virus.

But it can also cause polio in about two to four children per 2 million doses. (Four doses are required to be fully immunized.) In extremely rare cases, the weakened virus can also sometimes mutate into a more dangerous form and spark outbreaks, especially in places with poor sanitation and low vaccination levels.

These outbreaks typically begin when people who are vaccinated shed live virus from the vaccine in their feces. From there, the virus can spread within the community and, over time, turn into a form that can paralyze people and start new epidemics.

Many countries that eliminated polio switched to injectable vaccines containing a killed virus decades ago to avoid such risks; the Nordic countries and the Netherlands never used the oral vaccine. The ultimate goal is to move the entire world to the shots once wild polio is eradicated, but some scientists argue that the switch should happen sooner.

“We probably could never have gotten on top of polio in the developing world without the (oral polio vaccine), but this is the price we’re now paying,” said Dr. Paul Offit, director of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. “The only way we are going to eliminate polio is to eliminate the use of the oral vaccine."

Aidan O’Leary, director of WHO's polio department, described the discovery of polio spreading in London and New York as “a major surprise,” saying that officials have been focused on eradicating the disease in Afghanistan and Pakistan, where health workers have been killed for immunizing children and where conflict has made access to some areas impossible.

Still, O'Leary said he is confident Israel, Britain and the U.S. will shut down their newly identified outbreaks quickly.

The oral vaccine is credited with dramatically reducing the number of children paralyzed by polio. When the global eradication effort began in 1988, there were about 350,000 cases of wild polio a year. So far this year, there have been 19 cases of wild polio, all in Pakistan, Afghanistan and Mozambique.

In 2020, the number of polio cases linked to the vaccine hit a peak of more than 1,100 spread out across dozens of countries. It has since declined to around 200 this year so far.

Last year, WHO and partners also began using a newer oral polio vaccine, which contains a live but weakened virus that scientists believe is less likely to mutate into a dangerous form. But supplies are limited.

To stop polio in Britain, the U.S. and Israel, what is needed is more vaccination, experts say. That is something Columbia University's Barrett worries could be challenging in the COVID-19 era.

“What’s different now is a reduction in trust of authorities and the political polarization in countries like the U.S. and the U.K.,” Barrett said. “The presumption that we can quickly get vaccination numbers up quickly may be more challenging now.”

Oyewale Tomori, a virologist who helped direct Nigeria’s effort to eliminate polio, said that in the past, he and colleagues balked at describing outbreaks as “vaccine-derived,” wary it would make people fearful of the vaccine.

“All we can do is explain how the vaccine works and hope that people understand that immunization is the best protection, but it’s complicated,” Tomori said. “In hindsight, maybe it would have been better not to use this vaccine, but at that time, nobody knew it would turn out like this.”

 
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night driver

ESFP adrift in INTJ sea
I tested positive for TB until I was about 35. Grandfather died of it when I was about 6-ish.

MY short leg is from Perthes which is a hereditary issue. Though I was born in '51, "The Silent Summer"
 
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